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Find Food Pantries and Food Programs in Chicago and Cook County

Use our find food map to view hours, locations and information for all of our Chicagoland food pantries, meal programs and distribution partners.

Get Food Today or Tomorrow

We’re here whenever you need us.

Start getting access to a diverse selection of healthy foods and get help from the Greater Chicago Food Depository in moving towards a more stable, food-secure future.

Have Questions About Visiting a Food Pantry or Program?

Our network is here to provide food to anyone in need. Read our frequently asked questions to learn more about how our network will help you and your family.

Find a Food Pantry

Explore our Network of Food Pantries and Programs in Chicago

Search the map using your address or zip code to find free groceries or a hot meal at a food pantry, soup kitchen, shelter or mobile distribution in Chicago and Cook County. Use the map filters to find a food pantry that is open today or on the day that works best for you to visit. Click "More Filters" to filter for sites with additional support services, like diapers, delivery service and more.

Pastor Sandy Gillespie
Pastor Sandy Gillespie
Director of Chosen Tabernacle food pantry

“We do what we can to make a dent (in the need for food in our community.)

It’s a labor of love.”

Read how Pastor Sandy and her pantry are helping to end hunger one meal at a time

Pastor Sandy Gillespie
Director of Chosen Tabernacle food pantry
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What to Expect at a Food Pantry

Food is a human right.

Food is a human right — and everyone deserves to be cared for with dignity and compassion. Our food pantry partners share this belief, and food pantries today are more like a local market than anything else.

Most food pantries today are more like grocery stores. You choose what you want and volunteers may help you load your car.

The Food Depository is Chicago’s food bank. We provide food for people facing hunger and food insecurity. Visit a food distribution today to receive healthy food and groceries for yourself and your family.

Search for a food pantry on the map

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Lisa Griffin
Lisa Griffin
visitor at Common Pantry

“I’m very happy to have this place.”

After suffering a stroke, tragically losing her son and having to retire from a job that she loved as a nursing assistant, Lisa finally had to admit she needed help. That’s when she first walked through the doors of her local food pantry, Common Pantry. Since then, she visits the pantry occasionally and takes comfort in knowing that it’s there whenever she experiences financial hardship.

Read how Common Pantry helps Lisa and her neighbors

Lisa Griffin
visitor at Common Pantry

More Ways We Help

Need Help With Something Else?

In addition to our extensive food-focused programming, we also help provide job training and healthy eating resources. Get the help you need to take care of yourself and your family.

FAQs

Who Can Receive Food and Other FAQs

Anyone and everyone. Though some of our partners’ programs are just for older adults or children, the vast majority of our network is open to anyone who walks in the doors. The Food Depository and its network partners proudly serve all of our neighbors, regardless of race, religion, immigration status or any other factors.

You’ll find that our community partners are kind, welcoming and respectful. No one should be embarrassed or ashamed about seeking out food assistance in their time of need. Many people who experience food insecurity – a lack of consistent access to nutritious food – find that it’s a temporary situation. We all have our own challenges. Everyone needs a little help in life, and everyone is welcome at our programs.

Neighbors are NOT required to provide ID to receive service. Some partners may ask for ID depending on additional services provided and/or to verify that you reside in their service area and/or to ensure you do not exceed the permitted number of monthly visits, but no one is required to show ID to receive support. If in doubt, call ahead.

We also suggest that you bring a cart or sturdy bag to carry your groceries home if you are not driving. Some items, such as canned goods, rice and potatoes can get heavy.

Most food pantry and grocery distributions use an electronic intake system called Link2Feed that tracks basic information about visitors to the program. Most meal programs simply log the number of visitors at each gathering.

Only trained and authorized staff and volunteers at the food program and food bank can access this information on visitors. Link2Feed has best-in-class security protection to make sure no unauthorized users have access to this information.

Staff use this information to learn about the level of need in our community, who we may not be reaching, and how we can improve our services to end hunger in Cook County. It also reduces the amount of physical paperwork required, making intake faster and more secure.

Our map shows several kinds of food programs. While most of these programs are open to anyone who lives in Cook County, some of them have special requirements. It’s always best to call the program before you go.

  • Food pantries and grocery distributions are the most common type of programs. They offer a variety of food you can prepare at home.
  • Hot meal programs and soup kitchens offer prepared meals you can eat on-site during their hours.
  • Outdoor grocery distributions include programs like our mobile pantries and Producemobile trucks that distribute food at a community site, like a church parking lot.
  • Older adult/senior programs are open to people aged 60 and older.
  • Shelters offer meals to people experiencing homelessness. If you need shelter, call 311 in Chicago or 877-426-6515 in suburban Cook County for help.

Some types of programs are not shown on our map. These include special programs for veterans, students, and people with certain health conditions.

Every program offers different food. You can expect a mixture of fresh produce and packaged food.

Some food programs offer a waiver so that a friend or family member can pick up food for you. This can help people with disabilities and older people. Call the program to find out what they offer. A small number of programs offer home delivery.

If you live within the city of Chicago, you can also call 311 to connect with other forms of food assistance that offer home delivery.

No. Our pantries and programs are proud to serve anyone who asks for food. We understand that there are several circumstances in which someone might need help. We offer food to anyone who asks for it, regardless of the circumstances.

No. We work hard to ensure there is enough food for everyone. If you worry about affording your next meal, please visit a food pantry or program in our network. We are here to help.

Yes. Our pantries and programs help anyone in need of food, regardless of criminal history.

No. We believe that food is a basic human right. We proudly serve anyone in need of food.

If any information needs to be updated on your map listing, please contact the Partner Services team.

Stories

Hear More Stories From Our Community

Our team is on the ground in our community. Hear stories from food pantry directors, community volunteers and food pantry visitors.

Contact Us with Questions

You can use our form to get in touch or call us during business hours with questions.